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Bowl

Label Text

Considered one of the five "great wares" of Chinese ceramics, Jun ware was produced at a number of kilns in Henan province from the Song dynasty (960-1279) through the fifteenth century. The distinctive blue colors of the glaze—which can range from greenish-blue to violet—are the result of a chemical reaction that occurs during the firing and cooling process. Variations in tone occur because some areas of the pot are less thickly glazed than others. This chromatic complexity appealed to Freer, who acquired many examples of Jun ware. In the Peacock Room, which Freer called "the blue room," this bowl was one of more than forty Jun or similarly blue-glazed ceramics displayed along the south wall, just beneath Whistler's allegorical mural of two battling peacocks.

Object Name

Bowl

Ware

Jun ware

Dated

1279-1368

Period

Yuan dynasty

Medium

Stoneware with Jun glaze and copper pigment

Dimensions

HxW: 9.4 x 20.1 cm

Country

China

Credit Line

Gift of Charles Lang Freer

Iteration

2

Shelf Number

117

Wall

South

Title

Bowl

Object Number

F1905.310

Freer Source

R. E. Moore

Freer Source City

New York

Freer Source State

New York

Freer Source Country

United States

Image

http://141.217.97.109/plugins/Dropbox/files/peacock-jpg/JPEG/F1905.310.jpg

Collection

Citation

"Bowl," in The Peacock Room, Freer Gallery of Art, Smithsonian Institution, Accession No. F1905.310, Item #3249, http://www.peacockroom.wayne.edu/items/show/3249 (accessed November 19, 2017).