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Tea ceremony water jar

Label Text

Freer purchased this tea ceremony water jar, with a clear crackled glaze suffused with opalescent blue, in 1900 from the Fifth Avenue shop of Yamanka and Company. Although its origins were uncertain in Freer's day, it is now dated to the Momoyama period, in the early seventeenth. It shows a distinctly Korean influence: In the aftermath of Japan's two invasions of the Korean peninsula in the 1590s, sometimes known as the "Pottery Wars," hundreds of Korean potters were resettled within warrior domains in southern Japan. The kilns that they established became important sources of tea-ceremony ceramics and tablewares. Early southern wares like this reflect the shapes, glazes, and decorative techniques of their Korean prototypes.

Object Name

Tea ceremony water jar (mizusashi)

Ware

Agano ware

Dated

1602-1615

Period

Momoyama period

Medium

Stoneware with wood-ash and rice-straw-ash glaze

Dimensions

HxWxD: 15.6 x 21.2 x 21.2 cm

Country

Japan

Credit Line

Gift of Charles Lang Freer

Iteration

2

Shelf Number

54

Wall

North

Title

Tea ceremony water jar

Object Number

F1900.4a-b

Freer Source

Yamanaka and Co.

Freer Source City

New York

Freer Source State

New York

Freer Source Country

United States

Image

http://141.217.97.109/plugins/Dropbox/files/peacock-jpg/JPEG/F1900.4a-b.jpg

Collection

Citation

"Tea ceremony water jar," in The Peacock Room, Freer Gallery of Art, Smithsonian Institution, Accession No. F1900.4a-b, Item #3142, http://www.peacockroom.wayne.edu/items/show/3142 (accessed November 19, 2017).