Share:

Incense container with Chinese lion-dog on lid

Label Text

Freer purchased this Edo period incense container from the sale of the Samuel Colman collection just after the turn of the twentieth century. Colman (1832-1920) was an early collector of "Oriental art" in America: in 1880, a number of his pieces, including Chinese porcelain and a Japanese suit of armor, were displayed at the Ortgies Gallery in New York City. The open-mouthed lion may have been derived from a similar motif on a style of Ming dynasty Chinese bronze incense burner (with the lion's mouth serving as smoke vent). In the Peacock Room, this piece was on the far right end of the mantel; an earthenware cat (F1897.33) was placed on the far left. Between these two animal figures Freer arrayed a number of simple tea bowls in varying shade of brown.

Object Name

Incense box (kogo)

Ware

Raku ware, unknown workshop

Dated

19th century

Period

Edo period

Medium

Raku-type earthenware with red slip under clear lead glaze; partial gilding

Dimensions

HxWxD: 5.2 x 5.2 x 4.3 cm

Country

Japan

Credit Line

Gift of Charles Lang Freer

Iteration

2

Shelf Number

33.1

Wall

North

Title

Incense container with Chinese lion-dog on lid

Object Number

F1902.63a-b

Freer Source

American Art Association

Freer Source City

New York

Freer Source State

New York

Freer Source Country

United States

Image

http://141.217.97.109/plugins/Dropbox/files/peacock-jpg/JPEG/F1902.63a-b.jpg

Collection

Citation

"Incense container with Chinese lion-dog on lid," in The Peacock Room, Freer Gallery of Art, Smithsonian Institution, Accession No. F1902.63a-b, Item #3114, http://www.peacockroom.wayne.edu/items/show/3114 (accessed November 19, 2017).