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Tea bowl

Label Text

This shallow, amber-glazed tea bowl is dated to the third quarter of the sixteenth century Muromachi or Momoyama period, and is associated with the historic ogama production phases of the Mino kilns of Japan. At the time of production, iron was added to the ash glaze to enrich its coloration; over time, dregs of tea stained the bowl, giving it an even warmer finish. Freer purchased this bowl in 1898, on New York's Fifth Avenue, from Yamanaka and Company, noting that it was "extremely rare-very early." The shape of this tea bowl is termed hirawan and the vessel would traditionally be placed on a lacquer stand. In the Peacock Room in Detroit, however, it appeared on a shelf to the left of La Princesse du Pays de la porcelaine.

Object Name

Tea bowl

Ware

Mino ware

Dated

third quarter 16th century

Period

Muromachi or Momoyama period

Medium

Stoneware with iron slip under ash glaze; gold lacquer repairs

Dimensions

HxWxD: 5.7 x 15.9 x 15.9 cm

Country

Japan

Credit Line

Gift of Charles Lang Freer

Iteration

2

Shelf Number

9

Wall

North

Title

Tea bowl

Object Number

F1898.465

Freer Source

Yamanaka and Co.

Freer Source City

New York

Freer Source State

New York

Freer Source Country

United States

Image

http://141.217.97.109/plugins/Dropbox/files/peacock-jpg/JPEG/F1898.465.jpg

Collection

Citation

"Tea bowl," in The Peacock Room, Freer Gallery of Art, Smithsonian Institution, Accession No. F1898.465, Item #3082, http://www.peacockroom.wayne.edu/items/show/3082 (accessed November 19, 2017).